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Calibre Fitness Blog

 

 

Steve: This is Steve from Calibre Fitness, interviewing Sam Soliman, How are you doing, Sam?

Sam: G’day mate, How you going?

 

Steve: Yeh, great thank you. Sam, where did you get the nickname ‘the king’ from?

Sam: Haha, funny enough, Mum made that up when I was a kid.

 

Steve: Haha, so you’ve had it for some time!

Sam: Yeh, I was a former kick boxer back in the late 80s, early 90s and my parents come from Egyptian descent and King Solomon was a wise man in the bible and so she used to call me king Solomon the wise man and it’s stuck with me ever since.

 

Steve: Fantastic. What prompted you to make the change from kickboxing to boxing?

Sam: Probably 2 things, 1 financially it paid better. And I loved the sport of boxing and kickboxing. Couldn’t do both because my shins could only take so much, after 13 years of kickboxing, so I turned to boxing and as a job, it was a lot easier.

 

Steve: Yeh, fair enough. Could you describe a typical training week leading up to a fight.

Sam: Early nights, early morning runs, a hard session in the afternoon, usually core strength then night time boxing and sometimes my trainer would change it up and have me doing my boxing in the afternoon, Dave Hedgecock, who they nicknamed ‘The Rock’, because he’s like a rock. He does my boxing sometimes in the morning, sometimes in the evenings; he changes it up just so my body doesn’t get comfortable to one or the other. He also likes to train me at night at the same time as the fight, so he often trains me at 9:30pm, a similar time to when the fight is just to get the body clock right for the fight, which is a pretty clever thing. Between that and my conditioning coach Christian Enor, who puts me through the hard yards in the gym, it makes the fight a whole lot easier.

 

Steve: Yeh, fantastic. And how many days would you train a week, is it 5-6 days a week leading up to a fight or less?

Sam: I’d be doing 3-4 days of agility and strength work with Chris and 5 day a week with Dave Hedgecock boxing, so boxing gets me ready for each fight that’s coming up, and conditioning and strength ensures that I go the distance, if I need to go the distance. So it’s getting the best of both worlds.

 

Steve: Yeh, okay great… and what is your diet like?

Sam: Very important, definitely one of the most important things in my life. Unlike other diets from other sports, this is not only about being fit and in good condition, but making the weight, so say a boxer has to come in at 72.5kg, but he walks around at about 76… To bring that weight down correctly, dieting correctly is will result in you being 100% safe, whereas if a fighter doesn’t do that, then he’s in trouble in the fight because it takes a lot of steam out of you, a lot of energy out of you and a lot of fuel out of you, so if you’ve dropped the kilo’s the night before a fight to make the weight, then in 24 hours try to rehydrate yourself which is never the case, you can only rehydrate yourself over a minimum of 48 hours or else you can suffer serious dehydration. So, yeh… it’s very important. Very good question.

 

Steve: Thank you. You’re in great form at the moment, winning your last 6 fights, with the last 4 in KO’s. When’s your next match?

Sam: I’ve been doing well, dropping 4 of the last 6 and, and even the one before that wasn’t a KO, but I did drop him a few times and it went to the decision, but it was a good fight for us, that’s what’s got me where I am today which is IBF number 2 ranked fighter in the world and it was a current IBF world champion, holding 2 world titles was the icing on the cake. He hasn’t held all 3, only Kostya Tszyu’s held all 3, WBA, IBF and WBC and Daniel Geale, our Champion in Sydney, I say ‘our’ because he’s Australia, he went to Germany, won the IBF world title, now he’s defending it in Germany against the WBA world champion, if he wins that, then he becomes both the WBA and IBF world champion which means that, he’ll be dual world champion and when I fight him it’ll be for both belts, which will mean I’ll become super champ the way Kostya Tszyu was, he’s the only other Australian that’s held all 3, so it’s going to be a real honour to get the opportunity at that. But first things first, I’ve got a guy in front of me to fight in August… So beat him, and then we’ll look at the big picture and getting a fight with Geale.

 

Steve: Cool. I just heard a comment recently, do you think Daniel Geale is trying to avoid fighting you?

Sam: That question’s been asked by me and talked about for so long, but the fact of the matter is, he’s keen to fight anyone, he fought in Germany’s home town, Sebastian Sylvester, who was the world champion for a period of time in Germany and he was a good fighter and Daniel went over there… It’s always hard to travel and win, but he did that and prevailed, so I don’t know about him avoiding me, but I’d say more he’s keen to make sure he doesn’t come across a fighter that’s hard to hit and is on a winning streak and KO’ing his opponents, and that’s where we are at the moment. So it could be the reason why the fight’s not happening, but fortunately for us, the IBF will force the fight, because come December, provided we prevail in August against Giovanni Lorenzo, for the IBF world title eliminator, then the fight’s going to be 100% locked in.

 

Steve: Fantastic, what has been the highlight of your career to date?

Sam: Hmmm, I’ve had quite a few big fights overseas and in Australia, but I think probably my biggest highlight was having the opportunity to fight pound-for-pound the best fighter in the world, Ronald ‘Winky’ Wright, going the distance for 12 rounds with a guy that beat Sam Mosley, who beat Oscar Dela Hoya, who beat Trinidad, who beat all the best fighters that I’ve been following and been a fan of for so many years. For him to beat all them, and then for me to go the distance with him was definitely one of the biggest highlights. Also, beating Raymond Joval for the IBO world title eliminator, and he was the current IBO world champion, beating him in Los Angeles was a huge victory and was won on my favourite times in my life.

 

Steve: I’m sure you’ve suffered a number of injuries throughout your sports career, have there been any particularly bad injuries?

Sam: I’ve done my 5, 6, 7 Spinal Disk, both shoulders torn, I’ve had floating bone in the elbow, I’ve had fractured metacarpal breaks in my forearms. Torn hamstrings, torn quads, torn calves. I’ve had cracked ribs… There’s no part of my body that hasn’t suffered something, but you know what, you just battle on and accept that it’s part of the sport, and by doing that you overcome it quicker than if you dwell on it and cry over spilt milk, it takes a lot longer to heal and mentally messes with you.

 

Steve: Sure, you came 3rd on the American Television show ‘The Contender’, how did you get involved with the show and how did you find the experience?

Sam: It was a huge opportunity, a friend by the name of Stewart Duncan had connections in America who were able to get me on to the show, I basically just sent them my resume and everything I’d done in my career and it didn’t take them more than 24 hours to get back to me and say we want to bring you over, so we flew up there and had the opportunity to work with guys such as Sugar Ray Leonard and Buddy McGirt who’d fought my favourite fighter and he was actually in my corner for that fight, but unfortunately for me, my trainer wasn’t allowed in my corner for that fight because it was a reality TV series, they choose who takes your corner for the fight, but fortunately I had guys like Sugar Ray Leonard and that, and I got to meet and greet with a few of my favourite fighters of all time, and it was just a really, really good experience.

 

Steve: Fantastic, you’re renowned for being willing to fight anyone, anywhere… Which is a bit of a boxing cliché, I guess. Have you ever found yourself in any unusual fighting situations?

Sam: Many, many, many times, I’ve fought on 6-7 different islands, like Papua New Guinea and Fiji and places like that, I’ve fought in over 30 countries around the world. Probably the most unusual one was when I went to Thailand for a holiday with a mate and he left, he only stayed for a couple of days and then went back home, and I stayed for another 4-5 days after that. I went to a kickboxing show to watch a fight (this was when he was a kick boxer) and while I was watching the fight, they asked me are you a fighter and I said ‘yes’, they asked me if I knew who the guy who just fight, and I said yes, he was the current Thai champion, he’d won 116 fights, 11 losses. They asked me if I wanted to get the gloves on and have a fight, haha. I told them that all my stuff was at the hotel, I told them I’d get it all sorted and get back to them within 24 hours. They said ‘no problem, we’ve got stuff for you here. We’ve got gloves, we’ve got shorts, do you want to fight now?’ I said okay. So I went from being on a holiday watching the kickboxing, going in the change rooms, getting some gloves on. I had that many helpers, helping me out, putting gloves on me and strapping my ankles, and getting me ready for the fight. It was just so unexpected, but a great experience. I went to the wall with a Thai fighter and it was just really good fun, an experience I’ll never forget.

 

Steve: I imagine it’s pretty tough after a brutal fight, how does it feel when you wake up the morning after a really tough fight and how do you recover?

Sam: You can be the sorest, most painful person on the planet, and the fact that you’ve just been to war, whether you’ve won or lost, and you had thousands of people cheering you and you were doing what you loved, those sores are good sores… They remind you of how good the night before was, it’s just hard to explain. You know, you get an injury from a car accident, or you get an injury from something else, you wake up sore and regret what’s happened. I wake up sore, and it’s almost like a thank you reminded of how good the night before was.

 

Steve: Great. You’re in phenomenal condition for your age, how many fights do you think you’ve got left in you?

Sam: Everybody’s different. Some bodies can last longer than others; it depends on a lot of things, how they go to the gym and more importantly, how well they look after their bodies and how they treat their body. If I were an alcoholic, or I loved having a drink with the boys and didn’t know when to stop, or if I smoked cigarettes or if I left stones unturned and failed to do everything I can do to look after myself, I probably wouldn’t have been able to last this long. I don’t train for a fight the way other people train for a fight, a lot of people fight and then splurge, I don’t do that, I fight, and then once that’s over, I still keep myself in shape. Not in peak shape, you know, you have to put your hair down and enjoy life a little bit, but at the same time, enjoying life doesn't mean getting on the grog or putting on 10kgs, eating junk food and things like that. Letting your hair down means, having a few later nights, 2-3 beers with the boys on a weekend. I keep reminding myself that what you love doing is what’s important and I love my boxing, so those sacrifices are easy to make. So at 38, the way I look after my body now, I should have a couple of years left in me.

 

Steve: Fantastic, I guess that’s why you really ready to fight anyone anywhere.

Sam: Yeh, that’s right, you never know when a phone call’s going to come round the corner and someone’s going to say Sammy can you come down to such and such to fight.

 

Steve: You’re well known for your dedication to training, what’s your most hated training exercise?

Sam: That’s a hard one, because for me it’s the more pain the merrier. I remember when I was a kid I used to hate swimming and I used to think it’s just too hard, and now I swim like a fish, I hang out with a few swimming champions, and they’ve been my inspiration in that and before I met them I learnt how to swim, and now they’ve just perfected my style of swimming and now the one type of fitness I always hated the most because I couldn’t do it, is one of my favourites.

 

Steve: I’m sure you’ve sparred with some phenomenal boxers, who has been your toughest sparring partner?

Sam: I would say, Rudy Markussen, he didn’t get the recognition he deserved, he’s a champion in Denmark, he’s had 31 wins 3 losses, but he was 28-0 when I was sparring with him. He’s fought and beat many of the best fighters in the world and I was fortunate enough to do a bit of work with him when I was in Denmark and he would have to be up there with the best sparring partner I’ve had. Then, of course, Kostya Tszyu, they’d both be in the top 5 of the thousands of people I’ve sparred with in my life, from all over the world.

 

Steve: What does the future hold for Sam Soliman? Any chance of a switch to MMA?

Sam: Maybe table tennis, haha. Nah, I’ll skip the MMA, I love watching it, big fan of Randy Couture, but I think after boxing I’ll return to martial arts, I love taekwondo and conditioning, competitive sports in self defence, so I think I’ll continue to do that with my career. Also, Aussie rules, I can’t play it that well, but I love the game and love to watch it, so having a kick with the boys would be my idea of sport after boxing.

 

Steve: So Sam, how do you survive on the wage of a boxer?

Sam: Boxing is a 24/7 sport, 24/7 meaning that it’s something you’re training for 24/7, you know you’re doing your 3 hours a day, 6 days a week but you have to have a wage coming in to pay the bills, so I’ve got a family and a kid, I need to be able to look after my son and my wife. Thanks to Hungry Jack’s and Road Worx, U-build, companies that have supported me and sponsored me, TLS Total Logistics Solutions, I’ve been fortunate enough to have them by my side and cover my wage while I’m in training and believing in me and believing that their investment’s a good one.

 

Steve: What is your next fight coming up?

Sam: So, I’m fighting in the IBF world title eliminator, I’m one fight away from fighting Daniel Geale for the title.

 

Steve: Fantastic, so that’s in August?

Sam: We’ll fight 3 days out, so my next fight is for the IBF number 1 spot in the world, I’m currently number 2 and my opponent I’m fighting is number 6 in the world, he’s the one to put his hand up to take the fight. The winner fights Geale for the IBF and WBA world title, so we’ve got everything on the line for this fight and also flighting for Men’s Health, prostate cancer foundation, it’s a charity event that money will be going towards the charity at the same time, so it’s a key fight, should be a cracker, at the Geelong Arena.

 

Steve: Okay, great. Thanks very much for your time Sam.

Sam: No problem Steve!

 

Click here for more information about Sam's next fight

 

 

Posted in Interview By Calibre Fitness

Watch this montage of some of Australia’s greatest ever sporting achievements to get you in the Olympic mood. From Cathy Freeman’s awe-inspiring 400m run at the Sydney Olympics, to Steven Bradbury’s unlikely win 2002, it’s all here!

Posted in Latest News By Calibre Fitness

Events in August

July 30, 2012

July 27 - Aug 12

Olympic Games:
London UK

 

Aug 17

Athletics:
Diamond League, Stockholm, Sweden

 

Aug 25

Rugby:
Australia v New Zealand, Bledisloe Cup & Four Nations, Eden Park, Auckland

Aug 2 - Aug 5

Golf:
USPGA Tour/WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, Akron, Ohio

 

Aug 17 - Aug 19

Motorsport:
Australian Superbikes Rnd 6, Phillip Is, Vic

 

Aug 25

Rugby League:
Carnegie Challenge Cup Final, Wembley Std, London UK

Aug 2 - Aug 5

Golf:
USPGA Tour/Reno-Tahoe Open, Reno, Nevada

 

Aug 18

Rugby:
Australia v New Zealand, Bledisloe Cup & Four Nations, ANZ Std, Sydney

 

Aug 25 - Aug 26

Triathlon:
ITU World C’ships, Race 6, Lausanne, Switzerland

Aug 2 - Aug 5

Motorsport:
World Rally C’ships, Rally Finland

 

Aug 18 - Sep 9

Cycling:
UCI World Tour, Vuelta a Espana, Spain

 

Aug 26

Athletics:
Diamond League, Birmingham, Great Britain

Aug 3 - Aug 5

Motorsport:
V8 Supercars/Ipswich 300, Qld

 

Aug 19

Motorsport:
MotoGP/Indianapolis USA

 

Aug 26

Cycling:
UCI World Tour, GP Ouest France - Plouay

Aug 4

Super Rugby:
Final

 

Aug 19

Cycling:
Vattenfall Cyclassics, Germany

 

Aug 26

Motorsport:
Superbike World C’ships, Moscow, Russia

Aug 5

Motorsport:
Superbike World C’ships, Silverstone, Great Britain

 

Aug 20 - Aug 26

Tennis:
Winston-Salem Open, USA

 

Aug 27 - Sep 9

Tennis:
US Open, New York

Aug 9 - Aug 12

Golf:
USPGA Tour/US PGA C’ship, Kiawah Island Resort, Sth Carolina

 

Aug 20 - Aug 26

Tennis:
WTA/New Haven Open, Yale, USA

 

Aug 28 - Sep 9

Cycling:
UCI MTB World C’ships, Austria

Aug 9 - Aug 12

Golf:
USLPGA Tour/Highland Meadows Golf Club, Sylvania Ohio

 

Aug 20 - Aug 26

Tennis:
WTA/Texas Tennis Open, Dallas

 

Aug 29 - Sep 9

Paralympic Games:
London, UK

Aug 12

Run:
City2Surf, Sydney, NSW

 

Aug 23

Athletics:
Diamond League, Lausanne, Switzerland

 

Aug 30

Athletics:
Diamond League, Zurich, Switzerland

Aug 14

Cycling:
UCI World Tour, Clasica Ciclista San Sebastian, Spain

 

Aug 23 - Aug 26

Golf:
USPGA Tour/The Barclays, Farmingdale, NY

 

Aug 31 - Sep 3

Golf:
USPGA Tour/Deutsche Bank C’ship, Northon, Mass.

Aug 15

Soccer:
Australia v Scotland, International friendly, Edinburgh, UK

 

Aug 23 - Aug 26

Golf:
USLPGA Tour/Canadian Women’s Open, Coquitlam BC, Canada

 

Aug 31 - Sep 2

Motorsport:
F1 GP, Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium

Aug 15 - Aug 19

Rowing:
World C’ships, Plovdiv, Bulgaria

 

Aug 24

Motorsport:
MotoGP/Brno, Czech Republic

 

Aug 31 - Sep 9

Cycling:
Mountain Bike World C’ships, Austria

Aug 16 - Aug 19

Golf:
USPGA Tour/Wyndham C’ship, Greensboro, Nth Carolina

 

Aug 24 - Aug 26

Motorsport:
V8 Supercars/Winton, Vic

     

Aug 16 - Aug 27

Surfing:
ASP World Tour/Billabong Pro, Teahupoo, Tahiti

 

Aug 24 - Aug 26

Motorsport:
World Rally C’ships, Rallye Deutschland

     
Posted in Events By Calibre Fitness

Calibre Olympics

July 30, 2012

For the Olympic Edition Newsletter, Steve and Dave decide to hold a Calibre Fitness Olympics, battling off in 10 Olympics events. Click to see who comes out on top!

Posted in Training Videos By Calibre Fitness

 

Zombie Run!

Cost: $0.99

Lacking Motivation? This is one of my new favourite Apps, There’s no better motivation than going on a run then all of a sudden you hear zombies breathing down your neck...

"You have a horde of Zombies 100m behind you and they're gaining"! You pick up your pace but still the gap becomes smaller and smaller! You can hear them behind you. You run even faster, heart pounding, blood rushes through your body, legs about to fail. Then you see a laneway, you charge down there, your radio flares up again, "Good job, I thought they had you there, not long left till you are back at base"...

I'm 3 kilometres away from home and now have to get back...

My Fitness Pal

Cost: Free

MyFitnessPal is one of the best all-in-one calorie counter and exercise trackers for Smartphone. A simple design and interface make using the app a quick chore rather than a fatiguing project, which is essential when trying to reach a fitness goal. It includes an enormous catalogue of more than 1.4 million foods, meals, recipes and also includes a barcode scanner for finding packaged foods' nutritional information. It gives you both daily and weekly overviews and most functions work in offline mode.

C25K

Cost: $1.99 (Free version available)

The appropriately named C25K (Couch to 5k) app is perfect for those who are new to the jogging world. A nine-week program—at three days a week—guides you through 30-40 minute sessions, each designed to improve your endurance. The first week calls for 60 seconds of running followed by 90 seconds of walking for 20 minutes plus a five-minute warm up and cool down. The second week increases to 90 seconds of running and two minutes of walking. Intensity continues to increase each week and an audio prompter tells you when it's time to run or walk so you can focus on more important things.

RunKeeper

Cost: Free

RunKeeper offers a tracking system to runners, cyclists, hikers and skiers alike. The app uses GPS technology to track your route and speed, and automatically uploads your data to the RunKeeper website after your workout. You can log in to view a history of all your activities, see the exact paths you've travelled (including elevation!) and share your progress with a built-in option to post to Facebook or Twitter.

WebMD

Cost: Free


This WebMD app bundles a symptom checker, first-aid guide, a drug and pharmaceutical database and listings for local health centres. You can also personalise it with pages relevant to you. The app is clean, simple and easy to navigate. It is definitely a must have app for any hypochondriac – as well as anyone else who enjoys free medical information and advice. The app offers helpful information about ailments from gallstones to MCL tears, and the ability to save your searches and other medical information for future use is convenient and practical.

Gym Hero

Cost: Free

Gym Hero is a pretty basic app. It is basically designed to prevent you having to take a pen and paper with them into the gym. The app tracks helps you track your work out with notes, data export, workout history, and even includes a personal assistant. You can also share your progress with friends over social media.

Fitness Buddy

Cost: $0.99 (Free version available)

A friend of mine turned me on to this. I decided to buy it. I love the abundance of exercises for each muscle group. No matter what you have to exercise with they have exercises grouped by the equipment or lack of. If you just have bands and are at home you just scroll down the the "B" for bands and there are exercises just for bands. This is a great app from the beginner and the enthusiast to assist in mixing up the exercises consistently so you do not get bored and your muscle get accustomed to.

NutritionTips

Cost: Free

Did you know that cut melon must be thrown out after two hours? Or that the leanest beef cuts include round steaks and roasts? Or that oysters contain protein, calcium, phosphorus and iron? This colourful app has fun facts like these and more than 500 others to help you have a safe and healthy diet. Each tip is written on a sleek Post-it look-alike. Swipe the page or shake your device for a new titbits.

Fitness Builder:

Cost: Free

This app contains the largest library of exercise images and videos (over 5,600). Whether you are a beginner trying to get your fitness lifestyle started or an enthusiast looking to excel further, Fitness Builder has it covered!

Here you can literally do it all! Offering anything form tracking strength/cardio, history & rep max, exercise, workout & body stat metrics, BMI/BMR, or even ask a fitness question to an exercise physiologist.

 

Sodium 101

Cost: Free

Evil salt is hidden in so many foods that you probably have no idea are bad for you. However, sodium can quickly put a dehydrated body in danger or cause your body to soar into dangerous high blood pressure zones. Salt intake is vital if you’re trying to shed poundage and excess bloat. Sodium 101 is an app that will raise your awareness when it comes to consuming the salt hidden in canned foods, snack foods, and processed sauces.

Posted in Latest News By Calibre Fitness

Click here to listen to the full interview

Background:

 

Australian Rules football

As a junior, Simon played Australian Rules football for Assumption College, Kilmore, where he kicked 100 goals in his senior year. This led to him being recruited for senior football by the St Kilda Football Club, where his father Kevin had played 49 games on a forward flank in the 1940s.

O'Donnell played 24 games and kicked 18 goals between 1982 and 1983 in what was then the VFL. However, he had continued to play cricket and retired from football to focus on his cricket career.

 

 

Cricket

As a cricketer, Simon O'Donnell played as an all-rounder for Victoria in the Sheffield Shield between 1984 and 1993, scoring a century in his first match. He went on to play 6 Test matches in 1985, 5 on the Ashes tour of England and one at home.

Seen as a limited-overs specialist with clever medium pace bowling and explosive lower order hitting, he played 87 One Day Internationals between 1985 and 1992, scoring 1242 runs and taking 108 wickets in his career. He played in Australia's 1987 World Cup Final victory, but soon after he suffered severe pain that was diagnosed as non-Hodgkin lymphoma. He staged a remarkable recovery to return to the Australian One-Day team in the 1988–89 seasons.

Simon maintained a very good batting strike rate of 80.96 runs per 100 balls in ODIs, almost double his scoring rate in Tests. For six years, O'Donnell held the record for the fastest half-century in One Day Internationals, a record which stood until 1996.

He was captain of Victoria for five seasons from 1988–89 and was part of the Sheffield Shield victory team in 90-91 and returned in 1993.

 

Media

Heavily involved in media, Simon O'Donnell hosted Melbourne radio station Sport 927's morning program with Kevin Bartlett until 2004.

With the Nine Network, O'Donnell has been a commentator of cricket and now presents The Cricket Show. Having owned and managed race horses through his company, O'Donnell Thoroughbreds International, he is also used as an expert on horseracing and hosts Nine's racing coverage.

 

 

Interview:

 

Steve: This is Steve at Calibre Fitness, sitting down with Simon O’Donnell. How are you, Simon?

Simon: Good Steve, good! All is well.

 

Steve: You’ve had a very busy career, in both Sports and Media, was is a hard decision to leave football to follow a cricketing career back in the early days?

Simon: Steve, it was. The main reason was that I was just a kid, only about 20 and I had 2 sides of sports I love, one saying you can’t play cricket while you’re playing footy, and the other saying you can’t play footy while you’re playing cricket and what are you going to do? They wanted an answer and I actually didn’t have one. The only conclusion I could come to was what my belly was telling me. It was a gut feel and nothing else... and that was to go and pursue the summer sport.

 

Steve: Okay, fantastic. Who do you feel is the best player that you’ve played with or against in cricket.

Simon: For many years it was Ian Botham, criteria being that I’d never seen anyone at that level being able to influence the game with bat, ball and fielding abilities... He was on the top of my tree for a long time, and then along came a fella by the name of Shane Keith Warne and he wins it hands down.

 

Steve: Wow, okay. Obviously, you have won a lot of big cricketing accolades, but what has been the highlight of your career?

Simon: Australia winning the world cup in ’87 by far. Victoria winning the shield in 1990-91 was fantastic, but I think where Australian cricket was in the early to mid 80s to what we achieved in ’87, a young group of blokes in an alien land, which India was to all of us in those days, because none of us had been there, that was an achievement as a group that I’ll never forget.

 

Steve: What was the toughest decision you’ve ever had to make in your sporting career

Simon: I think once you get to leadership positions in sport, you’ve got to tell people, often good mates, that their times up or they’re out of teams. I always used to try to always face that head-on and, best mates or not, you’d have to walk up and break the news, so that is probably the toughest thing you experience. But still, I talk about as if it were yesterday, that you need to make a decision to play cricket or footy, now it was wonderful to be able to be involved with those sports at the level that I was in those days, and then for someone to say you can only do one or the other. We were brought up playing footy in winter and cricket in summer. That’s what happened it the country, that’s what happened in the city. That was tough to come to grips with in the end, but one had to be given away for the other.

 

Steve: Were there any particularly bad injuries you endured in your career?

Simon: never broke a bone playing footy because I always tried to stay out as wide as I could, haha. I had some health issues in the middle that were major, with a cancer diagnosis, but again I wouldn’t term that as a sporting injury, that was something that popped up and had to be dealt with and hopefully we’ve dealt with it in the correct manner. If you’re going to play any sport, at any level you have to have a pain resistance to some extent, otherwise there are probably better things for you to do than play a physically active sport.

 

Steve: Absolutely. What advice would you give to a young cricketer, just starting out?

Simon: Enjoy. I suppose getting older, fatter and greyer each day, I look at the way kids progress through their sport now and I feel for them. People, and many of them unqualified, are taking the fun out of the game before they should. People need to enjoy what they do, and in particular kids, need have got to live and the best way they can improve their sport is by experience out on the ground, not some joker telling them that they have to do this and that, as a 13 or 14 year old. I really do object to that, because a lot of the people telling the 13 and 14 year-olds what to do didn’t know themselves what they should have done, and because they’ve read it in a book, now they believe they can. I think kids need to have a period in their life where they learn for themselves without human interference and without so-called ‘experienced’ interference. It’s a bit of a hobbyhorse of mine, just let kids be kids and learn their craft… and then the other stuff can come a little later on.

 

Steve: Next question, what do you do to keep fit these days?

Simon: Not much, haha. My body can’t stand too much these days, there’s definitely no running. Running shoes aren’t high on my agenda, not because I don’t want to, but just because I struggle to now. A bit of bike riding and a bit of cross training. Things that there’s a limited pain barrier, I’m quite happy with these days.

 

Steve: What’s been your most enjoyable horse racing win to date?

Simon: Manighar winning the BMW this year was fantastic, still the most excited I’ve been at a race meeting was Bauer running second in the Melbourne cup 3 years ago, even though we got beaten, I’ve never had an emotional experience in sport like that. I’d like to have it again and hopefully I do it before I stop breathing air. That was something that on one hand was a sad experience and a difficult experience to cope with and on the other hand, the exhilaration of being nearly there said ‘imagine what it’s like if some day you do get there’.

 

Steve: Well... My next question is, your horse Bauer ran second in the Melbourne Cup in 2008, I’m sure you’d love to better that result. Do you have a horse running in this year’s cup?

Well, I hope so. We’ve got a number of overseas horses set for the race at this stage, but so many elements of preparing horses is out of human control, so a lot of water has to pass under the bridge and I know that’s an old chestnut… But in horse racing you just have to hang on, and we’ve probably got 6-7 horses pointed towards the Melbourne cup at this stage, if we get one there it’s probably a pretty good effort, if we get two it’s a fantastic effort… If we got all of them, it’d be freakish. So, we just need to see how it all rolls out closer to the race, what weight you get, if the horses are injury free, if there form’s okay… A lot needs to happen between here and the first Tuesday.

 

Steve: What up and comer are you most excited about?

Simon: We’ve got a horse that won the Queensland Derby this year in Brambles; he’s a very exciting prospect. Even though Manighar’s been around for ages, he raced most of his career in Europe, and he’s come here and just blossomed, even though he’s an older statesman these days, he’s still something that’s very exciting to us, because he’s taken us on a journey in the last 6 months. He’s second to none in our point of view.

 

Steve: Outside of your own horse interests, who do you think is the horse to watch this spring carnival?

Simon: I hope it’s one of ours. There’s going to be a massive international contingent coming for the Melbourne cup. We may have a race that has no Australian participants in it from a breeding point of view, that’s how strong I think the form and numbers are going to be coming from Europe. Hopefully that isn’t the case, as I think it’s be sad for the race if we didn’t have Australian born and bred horses being competitive in it… But I must admit, that’s probably the way it’s shaping for 2012 and possibly 2013 unless we get our breeding right here, to get some stayers into the system in Australia.

 

Steve: Just back to Cricket once again, if you were heading Cricket Australia, what would you do to minimise the interference of 20-20 Cricket, and do you think it’s a good thing for the sport?

Simon: Sport’s now run by money, whether we like it or not and change is an offset of that. Without 20-20, we probably wouldn’t have the cricketing facilities or the following the game has. I think the first thing you have to do is accept the change that has happened to the game. Test Cricket still exists, Sheffield Shield cricket still exists, one-day cricket still exists and we’ve got this new phenomenon called 20-20 which finances the lot of them.

 

Steve: Fair enough, and just finally… Who is your early tip to win the AFL flag this year?

Simon: It won’t be my mob, St Kilda; they’re not quite up to it… They’re not far off it, but they’re not up to it. I’m thinking Adelaide… Or Collingwood. Of course I’m leaning towards Adelaide, because I’m the same as the 90% of the community, I hate Collingwood. They’re a fantastic team, Collingwood… But interstaters are going to be hard to beat this year. I don’t know if Sydney quite has it, but Adelaide and West Coast, I think are the two that are at the top of the tree for me to challenge Collingwood at the moment. Weather or not they can beat them is yet to be seen.

 

Steve: Well that’s it, thanks for your time… Much appreciated!

Posted in Interview By Calibre Fitness

Posted in Latest News By Calibre Fitness

Furious Pete transforms his body from flabby to extremely muscular in just 5 hours! He exposes how many supplements and various programs often deceive us with their so-called amazing transformations. Watch this video to see the tricks they can use to mislead us.

Posted in Latest News By Calibre Fitness

 

Workout Overview

 

Main Goal: Build Muscle

Workout Type: Single Muscle Group

Training Level: Beginner

Days Per Week: 2

Equipment Required: Barbell, Cables, Dumbbells, Machines

Target Gender: Male & Female

 

Workout Description

This arm building approach is broken up into three 2-week segments. The focus of each segment is as follows:

Weeks 1-2: Lower volume, low to moderate weight. You will be "easing" into training your arms twice a week.

Weeks 2-4: Moderate volume, moderate weight. The intensity and number of sets picks up during this middle segment.

Weeks 5-6: You will be training with higher volume and moderate weight. These 2 weeks will be very challenging.

Use as much weight as you can for each set. If you are able to hit the stated rep ranges, add weight the next time you perform the same exercise. After week 6 you may take a week off from training arms, or start the cycle over with week one. Play this by ear. If your arms feel too beat up, a week of rest will do you good.

 

Workout Schedule

 

Workout A - Monday

Workout B - Thursday

You may adjust this schedule as needed, but always keep as least 2 days off in between each training day.

Weeks 1-2

Workout A - Monday

Exercise

Sets

Rep Goal

Cable Curl

2

12-15

Dumbbell Tricep Kickback

2

12-15

Workout B - Thursday

Exercise

Sets

Rep Goal

Concentration Curl 2 12-15
Cable Tricep Extension 2 12-15

 

Weeks 3-4

Workout A - Monday

Exercise

Sets

Rep Goal

Seated Dumbbell Curl

3-4

10-12

Skullcrusher

3-4

10-12

Workout B - Thursday

Exercise

Sets

Rep Goal

EZ Bar Preacher Curl

3-4

10-12

Seated French Press

3-4

10-12

 

Weeks 5-6

Workout A - Monday

Exercise

Sets

Rep Goal

Barbell Curl

5

8-10

Tricep Dips

5

8-10

Workout B - Thursday

Exercise

Sets

Rep Goal

Chin Ups

5

8-10

Close Grip Bench Press

5

8-10

Posted in Featured By Calibre Fitness

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